Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Joe Pope/ dissing your boss

In Then We Came to the End, employees talk frequently about their dislike of Joe Pope, their default supervisor (see page 114 for an example). In real life, is this behavior among subordinates necessary to subvert the humiliation of having a “boss,”or does it just make things more difficult? Is dissing your boss’s every annoying move with co-workers an activity of solidarity or negativity?

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's more complicated than that. On one hand, dissing your boss with co-workers does make you feel better since it reinforces that you are not the problem- your boss is the problem. On the other hand, it also creates a negative atmosphere. Your boss may pick up on the atmosphere, feel more alienated, and be even more of a jerk. Ultimately, it may get you fired.

Lila said...

But is some level of commiseration sometimes necessary when your boss IS the problem?

Merlin said...

I think venting about crappy bosses (and co-workers and clients for that matter) is necessary to maintain some semblance of sanity in the workplace. Sometimes I just need someone to agree that a supervisor's behavior is wacky or off (and usually my co-workers are the ones most qualified to help me feel better about the crappy stuff because they have to deal with it too). But, that being said, there does come a point when venting becomes counterproductive because it sort of snowballs and instead of making you feel better it actually makes you feel worse. You can sometimes actually work yourself (and your co-workers) up more by dwelling on the flaws...